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Old 01-02-2018, 11:27 AM
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m3shelly m3shelly is offline
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Default Newly diagnosed Boston Terrier - thanks for this site!

Sorry if this gets long-winded, but I'm still in shock.

My husband and I rescued a Boston Terrier, George, 1.5 years ago, from a no-kill shelter. We were told he was approximately 4-years old (though our vet claims he is much older). We already had a Boston, Butch, who we had since a pup, and Butch is 10.5 years old.

These dogs couldn't be any different in attitude and demeanor. They look a lot alike, and are approximately the same size, but Butch has no-end to energy, and George has always been laid back and docile. We love them both to no end.

Around Christmas-time, we noticed George began having problems with urinating in the house, and wetting the bed while sleeping. He was drinking much more water than usual. We took him to our vet after this went on 4-5 days, and he was diagnosed with diabetes.

He was immediately prescribed insulin injections, with a new feeding schedule, 2X/day. We had previously only fed them 1X/day. George has always been a fast eater with endless hunger, and Butch would eat when he was hungry, rarely finishing his food at one sitting (until George came along and began finishing it for him if Butch walked away from his bowl).

George has already reduced his water consumption to near normal levels, and stopped urinating in the house (though he's let out more frequently than normal, since it is very, very cold here; <0įF.

Our vet didn't mention self-monitoring his levels. I want to thank you for providing info on this forum, and I have read the story/struggle of Chris. I'm not sure the exact brand of insulin, since I'm at work now, but we purchased the prescription at Walmart. George was also prescribed a powder to put on his food once/day, and an antibiotic to tackle a bladder infection due to high glucose levels in his urine.

I have some experience testing for BG levels in people, since my mother-in-law had Type II, and I had worked with her when she became too old to monitor herself. We also have experience administering shots to dogs, since our late lab had Addison's Disease that required injections every 28 days to keep him alive. I'm just happy that George doesn't show any signs of pain when injected; that would break my heart even more.

The main question I have is this: I have seen many people talking about the vet not trusting their home test results with the meters used on humans, or confirming those readings with a vet's meter before trusting the numbers. Like I said, our vet didn't even mention home-monitoring for some reason. Why, if I perform the proper calibration on the meter, should we not trust the test results, or duplicate the first couple curves with the vet's meter? I am a test engineer (not related to medical testing though), and am confident that I can obtain accurate results with an accurate meter, if testing on George is not too different than testing on my mother-in-law.

My biggest concern for the little guy is stress, right now, at least: we are moving to a new home next week, and that will be stressful enough, but there are going to be five days in between selling our current home and buying our new home. Both dogs (and people) will see a lot of stress during the change.

He was recently diagnosed, and I haven't purchased a meter, yet. I was hoping to allow George to go two weeks with his initial prescription levels (5-units insulin with food, twice/day), before beginning his first BG curve. Part of that wait time is for stabilization, and the other part is simply time during our move. Is that too long to wait before performing the first curve? Our vet did not prescribe a specific food, but we've always fed our little guys healthy Taste of the Wild food, as opposed to cheaper store brands like Purina, for instance. That began with our lab with Addison's, and the healthier food helped him <i>a lot</i>.

Again, thanks to all for the excellent information here on this site, and it helps to see everyone's stories.

Regards,
Shelly in Wisconsin
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Old 01-02-2018, 01:53 PM
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jesse girl jesse girl is offline
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Default Re: Newly diagnosed Boston Terrier - thanks for this site!

hi and welcome

waiting 2 weeks is ok to do a curve . the only reason you may want to start now is to periodically test for safety reasons

testing blood sugar takes away the guessing

meters get the job done as you know being a test engineering. its silly as far as i am concerned not to test . now handhelds are not an exact science but its close enough

dogs can live normal happy lives with maybe some limitations . the more you put into it the better the outcome
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Jesse-26 lbs - 14 years old - 9 years diabetic - one meal a day homemade and a vitabone snack - 3 shots of Novolin a day sometimes Novolog or r as a correction to higher sugar but that is rare. total insulin for a 24 hour period is between 6 and 8 units of NPH insulin depending on her fasting number
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Old 01-02-2018, 02:14 PM
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m3shelly m3shelly is offline
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Default Re: Newly diagnosed Boston Terrier - thanks for this site!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jesse girl View Post
hi and welcome

waiting 2 weeks is ok to do a curve . the only reason you may want to start now is to periodically test for safety reasons

testing blood sugar takes away the guessing

meters get the job done as you know being a test engineering. its silly as far as i am concerned not to test . now handhelds are not an exact science but its close enough

dogs can live normal happy lives with maybe some limitations . the more you put into it the better the outcome
Thank you Jesse, for the quick reply. My sister is a Type II, and she has an extra One Touch meter with some extra test strips. I've done some research today about using various brands of meters.

Not surprisingly some sites claim people meters aren't accurate on dogs, but then charge more for the AlphaTrak.

If I can get a meter quickly, there's no reason for me to do some spot checking. I still don't see a complete curve done prior to 2-weeks passing. I just feel so bad, and almost feel guilty, like I should take an extra day off of work just to do that for him (wow, I love these little guys a lot, I guess).
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Old 01-02-2018, 04:43 PM
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farrwf farrwf is offline
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Default Re: Newly diagnosed Boston Terrier - thanks for this site!

Hi and welcome. Some here bought cheap meters, and compared readings to the vet's meter at his office and adjust their readings by the variance.
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Otis Farrell dx'd 12/10, best friend to his dad, Bill, for over 14 years. Left this world while in his dadís loving arms 10/04/13. Sonny Farrell dx'd 1/14, adopted 5/15/14. Left this world while in his dad's loving arms 9/06/16. Run pain free, you Pug guys, til we're together again.

Last edited by farrwf; 01-02-2018 at 04:46 PM.
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Old 01-02-2018, 05:43 PM
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Default Re: Newly diagnosed Boston Terrier - thanks for this site!

it seems like the higher the blood sugar the more the human meters might be off. My One Touch Ultra measured a little low so I just went with it.

Infections can cause higher blood sugar so I think home testing is a huge deal because George may need less insulin as his infection clears up.

Low blood sugar is way more dangerous than running a little high.

It sounds like you are on top of this. Adorable boy!

Judi
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Old 01-02-2018, 06:48 PM
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MikeMurphy MikeMurphy is offline
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Default Re: Newly diagnosed Boston Terrier - thanks for this site!

Hi and welcome to you and George.

A lot of us here use human meters. I use the ReliOn Prime and accept the numbers at face value, knowing that the readings run a little lower than the AlphaTrak 2.

Glad that you want to Home test. Itís the best tool available in the management of a dogís diabetes.
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Diabetes: Aug 2013 - Hypothyroidism: Dec 2013 - Cataract Surgery: Feb 2014
Insulin: Novolin R/N mix - Meter: ReliOn Prime
Nulo Adult Trim Cod & Lentils, Pumpkin, FortiFlora, Dasuquin, Thyroxine
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Old 01-03-2018, 03:27 AM
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Scooterspal Scooterspal is offline
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Default Re: Newly diagnosed Boston Terrier - thanks for this site!

Quote:
Originally Posted by m3shelly View Post
...I have seen many people talking about the vet not trusting their home test results with the meters used on humans, or confirming those readings with a vet's meter before trusting the numbers...
When you purchase a meter, like the $9 ReliOn Prime that Mike mentioned, and the one I also use, you will be given a phone # to call for a free bottle of test solution. This will allow you to check that your meter is within factory specs.

As to calibrating to a more expensive meter or lab test result, this is totally unnecessary. What you need to remember is what your goal is in all this and that is getting and keeping your pet at a level under 250 for most of the time throughout the day. This is considered "regulated".

Whether your meter reads out at 330 or 350 or 400 makes no difference at that point. Your dog is high, period.

Believe me, the meter is the least of your worries at this point. Start testing and work to getting BC levels under control as soon as possible.
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Diagnosed 9/15/17. A 17 lb. terrier mutt, 15 years old. My bestest friend. Novolin N 6U, Novolin R 3U, 2X/day. Cesar Classics 3.5 oz. packets w/ 4 tbsps of old fashion Quaker Oats, 2x day. Probiotic every 3 or 4 days. Omega 3, two 300 mg. capsules 1X/day for skin. Occuguard Plus, Billberry, Lutein, Vit E, Vit C every meal for eyes.
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Old 01-03-2018, 06:53 AM
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m3shelly m3shelly is offline
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Default Re: Newly diagnosed Boston Terrier - thanks for this site!

Thank you all for the kind welcome, and helpful advice. We are six days into this, and last night I picked up a One Touch Ultra meter from my sister, who has Type 2, and she had an extra meter with test strips. She also provided two types of lancing devices with lances that we can try. I plan on getting the calibration solution from One Touch, just to check the accuracy of the meter.

I remember a few years back, while caring for my elderly mother-in-law with Type 2. I tested her BG level, but I had no clue, so I didn't realize the meter had to be set for the strip (entering the # into the meter to coincide with the test strips). Her BG level read extremely high, and I panicked. Then I read the manual and got it correct, and her BG level was fine.

I'm happy that my little guy is starting to act more normal. I wouldn't doubt he's running high, but not nearly as high as before the diagnosis, insulin, and feeding schedule. I will start a spreadsheet and start testing tonight. I can always adjust the numbers if they're slightly off, when I receive the calibration solution.

Again, thanks for the warm welcome!
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Old 01-03-2018, 08:40 AM
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Default Re: Newly diagnosed Boston Terrier - thanks for this site!

A comment about lancets. The most common lancets you are likely to find in your local pharmacy are probably between 30 and 33 gauge (thickness). These are the ones most humans like. Some of us found these 30-33 gauge lancets are too thin to get a reliable blood drop from our pups, and prefer slightly thicker 25, or 26, gauge lancets. I usually bought 25 gauge from Amazon because I never found them stocked at local pharmacies.

Don’t get discouraged if you have trouble getting a blood droplet right away. It takes time to get your technique. Cold weather can make blood flow even harder. I remember some hot summer days when Annie had been sun bathing just before a blood test: the blood flowed like a river (almost scared me).

Craig
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Last edited by CraigM; 01-03-2018 at 11:26 AM.
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Old 01-03-2018, 08:50 AM
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m3shelly m3shelly is offline
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Default Re: Newly diagnosed Boston Terrier - thanks for this site!

Thanks Craig. I didn't look at the gauge on the products my sister gave me. I've been reading through the sticky thread about the gauge/location/brand/etc. that (more experienced) owners here prefer.

I plan on trying on his dew pad first. George has very thin pads, since we rescued him from a hoarder who never walked their many dogs; he grew up in a kennel. I know they're sensitive because he can't handle walking >1-block in Wisconsin in this cold weather, or if there is too much salt on the sidewalks/roads after a snowfall. I'm hoping that will mean it's easier to lance; wishful thinking maybe. I'll update.

Thanks!
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