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Old 01-30-2019, 05:18 PM
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Susan M Susan M is offline
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Default Out of control barking!

Hi,
My dog Max is diabetic and this forum has been a great resource for me. Even though this post is not related to his diabetes I was hoping someone here may have some advice for me. Max is a terrier and as you would expect is a barker, but his barking and "screaming" goes way beyond the norm. When he sees another animal he gets so excited that he becomes uncontrollable and begins to shriek and scream. I have tried exposing him to other animals more in hopes he would calm down but it seems to have gotten worse. He gets walked daily and is rarely left alone. Its so bad that other animals get defensive (I understand why) and Im worried that it will cause him to be attacked when we are out walking. Any advice would be appreciated....
Thanks
Susan
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Max 4 and half year old terrier mix. 17 lbs. Diagnoses 3/2018 5 units Novolin N twice a day.
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Old 01-30-2019, 06:05 PM
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Default Re: Out of control barking!

How old is max ? Sometimes as we get older we can get grumpy and defensive . I guess dogs can also . My jesse barks a bit more at dinner time and being a beagle its very loud . I have trained her to speak quiet . She will do it until it doesnt get her point across

Only training may help but for older dogs that becomes more difficult . Me and jesse run into a cattle dog named roxy . constantly barks anytime a dog crosses her path and its been that way for the 8 years me and jesse have run into her . We try to work with roxy because jesse is such a calming dog ( except for rabbits and dinner time ) She has gotten a bit better but being that type of breed they want to heard everything

Terriers can be very aggressive and its in there nature . Maybe you can work with a friends dog that may help to calm max or maybe some professional training would help
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jesse-26 lbs - 14 years old - 8 years diabetic - one meal a day homemade and a vitabone snack - 3 shots of novolin a day sometimes novolog or r as a correction to higher sugar . total insulin for a 24 hour period is between 6 and 8 units of nph insulin depending on her fasting number
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Old 01-30-2019, 11:56 PM
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Susan M Susan M is offline
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Default Re: Out of control barking!

Thanks for your reply,
Max just turned 5yrs old. He does the normal excited barking when Im getting his food ready or when someone comes to the door, thats fine, its the screaming ear piercing uncontrollable frenzy thats the problem. It sounds aggressive but its him being excited. He isnt wanting to engage other dogs in an aggressive way but unfortunately other animals think he is.
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Max 4 and half year old terrier mix. 17 lbs. Diagnoses 3/2018 5 units Novolin N twice a day.
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Old 01-31-2019, 05:55 AM
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Default Re: Out of control barking!

If it's a newly developed behavior it may be worth a vet visit. My diabetic boy had an obsessive love of barking (was a mixed breed with strong herding instincts). Over the years his barking got out of control. About six months after being diagnosed diabetic, he was diagnosed as being hypothyroid. Some of the earliest signs of hypothyroidism in dogs can be behavioral changes. This belief is somewhat controversial and not all vets believe that low thyroid levels cause behavioral challenges, however, it was something my family experienced first hand. Some vets also believe that hypothyroidism does not occur in younger dogs and will only test their T4 levels. A T4 level is less expensive but will not give you accurate answers. Your vet will need to run a full thyroid panel to accurately assess thyroid levels (especially in a diabetic, as the diabetes alone can cause the T4 level to be low).


A twice daily, inexpensive pill allowed my dog to regain the balance he'd started to lose when he was about three years old. He was eight when his hypothyroidism was dx.
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Holli & Decker // diagnosed November 5th, 2011 // Journeyed to the bridge January 26th, 2013, surrounded by his family at home // 9 years old // Levemir insulin // Hypothyroid // C1-C5 cervical spinal lesion // weight 87 lbs // Run with the wind my sweet boy. Run pain free. Holding you close in my heart till we meet again!
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Old 01-31-2019, 09:00 AM
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Default Re: Out of control barking!

Just one more thing to add me and jesse would run into a small poodle who would just scream on walk like a child if he saw another dog . It was quite a spectacle and me and jesse worked with that dog also . The owner did do some training and was able to gain more control of the situation . It took allot of work and consistency to make progress

I give you credit for continuing to take max out on walks as i know it must be stressful hope you can find a solution
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jesse-26 lbs - 14 years old - 8 years diabetic - one meal a day homemade and a vitabone snack - 3 shots of novolin a day sometimes novolog or r as a correction to higher sugar . total insulin for a 24 hour period is between 6 and 8 units of nph insulin depending on her fasting number
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Old 02-01-2019, 04:02 PM
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Default Re: Out of control barking!

I agree with checking for a medical issue such as hypothyroidism.

If all seems fine physically, find a good positive-methods-only trainer to help you.

His barking could be frustration because he wants to play but it also could be an expression of fear of other dogs and he barks to tell them to stay away from him.

Regardless of the source of the behavior, some simple training techniques can make a big difference. For example, one thing trainers do is show your dog that the sight of other dogs makes treats "rain from the sky" and so is a positive thing, especially if he is scared. And even if not scared, distracting him with treats teaches him over time to ignore other dogs. You can also distract him by working on other behaviors, such as sit or heel or tricks - replacing his barking with some kind of fun interaction and treats as rewards. If he's concentrating on you, he won't be concentrating on the other dogs.

A good trainer could really help you out with just a session or two and sometimes classes are another good way to deal with this.

Many more dogs are fearful than people realize. Even terriers!

We have a dog who was so fearful that he would bite what scared him. We worked with a really great behaviorist and also ultimately gave him anti-anxiety medication because he was so fearful - he still needs management, but our walks are a joy. He ignores other dogs and people and just enjoys himself because he feels safe.

Natalie
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