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  #1  
Old 03-27-2015, 05:16 PM
Lieder2 Lieder2 is offline
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Default Understanding Pepper's Juvenile Diabetes

I wanted to thank you for sharing your journey with Hero. There is so little out there on Juvenile Diabetes. We adopted a 2 1/2 month old puppy we named Pepper, 6 weeks ago and after having her home for two weeks we discovered she was diabetic. She is the first at our vet clinic with this diagnosis and we are all learning together how to best care for her. Anyway, it is encouraging to hear that what we are going through is not new and that Pepper is experiencing what others have gone through with their puppies. Today Pepper's blood sugar was 591 and we are back to figuring what the next plan of attack will be. Again, thank you!!!
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Old 04-06-2015, 06:44 AM
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Default Understanding Pepper's Juvenile Diabetes

I am starting a thread for Pepper - she recently posted in Hero's thread and wanted to share Pepper's journey with juvenile diabetes.
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Maggie - 15 1/2 y/o JRT diagnosed 9/2007, Angel status on 6/20/16. Her mantra was never give up but her body couldn't keep up with her spirit. Someday, baby.......
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Old 04-07-2015, 05:25 PM
Lieder2 Lieder2 is offline
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Default Re: Understanding Pepper's Juvenile Diabetes

It is believed that Pepper was found as one of two abandoned puppies of a stray. We know very little about her but believe her birthday is the end of November 2014. Our family adopted Ms. Pepper Potts in February 2015. We believed at the time she was a German Shepherd mix, with resemblances to Belgian Malinois and Black Cur. At four and a half months old she is much to small to be ANY of these breeds so the mystery remains. Pepper did great the first week or so at our house. It was the second and third weeks that we started to see her eating less and less and was not puppy like, active, playful, or energetic. We consulted with our vet about her food and tried a few samples to see if she liked a different brand. After a week of her not eating more than a 1/4 cup twice a day we went back to our vet. She was HORRIBLY thin and lethargic. Pepper was admitted for testing and once juvenile diabetes was diagnosed she stayed for treatment and further monitoring. Our vet, though experienced and recognized, had never before seen a case of juvenile diabetes. Let the learning begin!!!!

Today we struggle with a few things. The first is frustrating for me and that is potty training!!!! She urinates in the house all day long and in her kennel all night long. I know that diabetes causes her to drink more and have more frequent urine output but I really need her to go outside! The second is her eating. She eats like a queen but does not seem interested half of the time. For example, last week she ate every meal and left very little in her bowl (1 to 1 1/4 cup dry food moistened with chicken broth on top of cheese). This week, however, I cannot get her to eat more than 1/4 cup of her food at a time. In the past I have limited her food to just 8am and 8pm but when she is not eating that seems to make matters worse. She is a tiny thing so when she stops eating it is very apparent! The third and final concern is her high blood sugar. We test once a week and cannot get her blood sugar under 500. Last week we increased her insulin from 1 to 2 units twice a day and I am assuming we will increase it again this week. I am waiting for a call from the vet now.

I love how cuddly our Pepper is but would love to see her as a happy, healthy, playful, energetic puppy again. I know the diabetes will not go away but to get her blood sugar under control and her eating habits regulated would be outstanding!!!
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Old 04-07-2015, 06:59 PM
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amydunn19 amydunn19 is offline
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Default Re: Understanding Pepper's Juvenile Diabetes

Is Pepper spayed? Intact females have an awful time with regulation. The heat cycles play havoc with blood sugar. She may not have even had one yet but it won't be long and she may already have hormonal changes going on. If she has been spayed, that is helpful.

If you only test once a week, you cannot gauge her blood sugar at all and with her lack of eating, she could be experiencing some lows. Of course, the urination is indicative of a high range but she could be having wild swings. Has she had any blood glucose curves done? A curve is a blood glucose test that you start before her first meal(fasting) and testing every two hours until the evening. With juvenile diabetes, I think it is very important to consider testing her at home. (I am assuming that your vet is testing her). Young dogs are so challenging and can be a bit more unpredictable(not that diabetes is predictable).

How much does Pepper weigh?
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Old 04-07-2015, 07:02 PM
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jesse girl jesse girl is online now
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Default Re: Understanding Pepper's Juvenile Diabetes

hi and welcome my jesse was 5 when she became diabetic not a pup but fairly young she has lead a fairly normal dogs life for 5 years with the disease

it doesnt matter if its a pup or a senior dog as long as blood sugar is high there is little you can do about urinating and not eating well

would recommend testing blood sugar at home its a life time commitment and might as well start since pepper is a pup and trainable . being a puppy and possible change in blood sugar as they grow plus activity can make dosing blood sugar tricky . once a week testing at the vet may not get the job done and put the pup at risk

now are they doing a complete curve once a week or just one test ? if its just one test that will not get the job done
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Old 04-08-2015, 01:48 PM
Lieder2 Lieder2 is offline
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Default Re: Understanding Pepper's Juvenile Diabetes

Quote:
Originally Posted by amydunn19 View Post
Is Pepper spayed? Intact females have an awful time with regulation. The heat cycles play havoc with blood sugar. She may not have even had one yet but it won't be long and she may already have hormonal changes going on. If she has been spayed, that is helpful.

If you only test once a week, you cannot gauge her blood sugar at all and with her lack of eating, she could be experiencing some lows. Of course, the urination is indicative of a high range but she could be having wild swings. Has she had any blood glucose curves done? A curve is a blood glucose test that you start before her first meal(fasting) and testing every two hours until the evening. With juvenile diabetes, I think it is very important to consider testing her at home. (I am assuming that your vet is testing her). Young dogs are so challenging and can be a bit more unpredictable(not that diabetes is predictable).

How much does Pepper weigh?
Pepper was spayed two weeks before we found out she had diabetes. The vet tested her blood sugar for the first two weeks but I have been doing it since. I started taking it daily and was told that was too often. I was told that it takes a week for her insulin to make changes in her blood sugar. This being said, I have not done a curve on her but will start tomorrow morning!!!

When we got Pep she was 10 pounds. When she was admitted to the vet with her diabetic emergency she was less than 8. Her last weigh in she was 9.5 lbs.
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Old 04-08-2015, 02:59 PM
Lieder2 Lieder2 is offline
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Default Re: Understanding Pepper's Juvenile Diabetes

I have been checking Pepper's blood sugar myself and was advised to check it only once a week. At one point I was checking it daily and was told that was too often. She has never had a curve done but I will be doing one first thing tomorrow!!! Thank you so much for the suggestions and advice. I cannot begin to express how much I value the knowledge and support we are receiving during this journey with Pepper

Last edited by Lieder2; 04-08-2015 at 03:05 PM.
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Old 04-08-2015, 04:01 PM
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Default Re: Understanding Pepper's Juvenile Diabetes

Glad you will be doing a curve. Depending on her hormonal status prior to being spayed, the diabetes could be hormone-related. Not highly likely but possible. Because of that, it will be important to monitor her blood sugar carefully to see whether her diabetes resolves or, at the least, means she needs less insulin.

Many of us here test our dogs' blood sugar every day. How often you test is up to you and your dog.

The vast majority of dogs are very tolerant of testing. If you took a look at Chris' video at www.k9diabetes.com/bgtestvideos.html you will see how worked up he was! NOT! And he was tested three times a day every day because he got four meals and insulin injections a day.

So if your dog is okay with daily testing and that's what you want to do, I think it would be wise right now when the hormonal status may have been raising her blood sugar higher early on.

There really are not rules about it. Some vets still have the outdated view that it's cruel or that most dogs won't tolerate. The exact opposite is true. And some fear what you will do with the information. That's understandable, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't test. It just means you should work with the vet (there are some exceptions with vets who are terrible with diabetes) and not make decisions on your own until you both want to manage your dog's blood sugar yourself AND have the skill to do so.

We eventually took over our dog's blood sugar management thanks to home testing and a lot of studying.

Natalie
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Old 04-08-2015, 04:02 PM
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Default Re: Understanding Pepper's Juvenile Diabetes

Her age also means her diabetes will be in flux until she finishes growing. Another big big vote for daily blood sugar testing (and curves too periodically).

Natalie
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Old 04-08-2015, 07:28 PM
Lieder2 Lieder2 is offline
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Default Re: Understanding Pepper's Juvenile Diabetes

Thank you, Natalie! I truly have been encouraged by your comments. We have found that our vet is very open to listening to us but we are still getting to know them and them us. I will continue to monitor Pepper's blood sugar as I feel appropriate. She really does not struggle or fuss more than an occasional yip when getting a sample. We will work to do what is best for her as we learn more about her diabetes.

Teri
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