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  #71  
Old 01-12-2020, 03:21 AM
anotherk9lover anotherk9lover is offline
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Default Re: Who took their dog to a specialist? Advice?

btw how did you guys add a picture on here of your pet, I want to add daisy's.
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  #72  
Old 01-12-2020, 03:24 AM
anotherk9lover anotherk9lover is offline
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Default Re: Who took their dog to a specialist? Advice?

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Originally Posted by k9diabetes View Post

Our dog actually got four shots and meals a day, one every six hours. We set them at 10am, 4pm, 10pm, and 4am. That way, I could go to meetings and our for dinner, etc., and still generally be able to stay on schedule. So if there are better times for your two injections and meals a day, go ahead and use those.

The only rules are it's good if it works for your dog!

Natalie
What was the reason your dog needed insulin every 6 hours? That is a lot of work, wow I applaud you really! I think not many people would be able to work around a schedule like that. We sometimes struggle with twice a day.
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  #73  
Old 01-12-2020, 07:10 AM
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jesse girl jesse girl is offline
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Default Re: Who took their dog to a specialist? Advice?

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Originally Posted by anotherk9lover View Post
This is what Daisy was on before we found out she's diabetic. We took her off of it because of the simple carb content, potatoes etc. You think she can eat this? Even though there's things like rice and fruit in it?

yes . i give jesse milk bones that has molasses in it to help with the strength of insulin . potatoes and rice are helpful for most diabetic dogs . that is why the prescription food has quite a bit of carbs and works well in dogs

hmmm you may have stopped using a food that might have worked well

surprised you vet didnt understand this as prescription foods are loaded with carbs and fast to digest . the reason why dogs utilize this food because dogs seem to use insulin fast so they need that quick sugar
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Jesse-26 lbs - 15.5 years old - 10 years diabetic - one meal a day homemade and a vitabone snack - 3 shots of Novolin a day sometimes Novolog or r as a correction to higher sugar but that is rare. total insulin for a 24 hour period is between 8 and 10 units of NPH insulin depending on her fasting number
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  #74  
Old 01-12-2020, 07:28 AM
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jesse girl jesse girl is offline
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Default Re: Who took their dog to a specialist? Advice?

you have accomplished all the important things . shots are given and testing blood sugar is not to difficult . the nice thing about this you become less reliant on the vet and most end up this way on the forum . the last time i was at the vet there was no discussion of diabetes as for me he has nothing to offer that i already dont no . jesse has kept her sight for the 10 years . the more you put into it especially in the beginning the better the outcome
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Jesse-26 lbs - 15.5 years old - 10 years diabetic - one meal a day homemade and a vitabone snack - 3 shots of Novolin a day sometimes Novolog or r as a correction to higher sugar but that is rare. total insulin for a 24 hour period is between 8 and 10 units of NPH insulin depending on her fasting number
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  #75  
Old 01-12-2020, 07:46 AM
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Judi Judi is offline
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Default Re: Who took their dog to a specialist? Advice?

to be honest. Once I had Jenny fairly regulated and wasn't as worried about her going scary low, I didn't do too many curves. I would test her sugar before I fed her and gave her her shot. It got to the point where it just made me feel better.

I do know lots of people with diabetic dogs that don't test that often. The ones on this forum are usually the problem ones with multiple issues, like Daisy!

We all do the best we can. It's great you guys are all doing it together and like Natalie said, it does become routine. After my Jenny died it was weird not to have to be home every 12 hours.

When in doubt, give less insulin. Lows are the most dangerous thing.

hang in there!
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Jenny: 6/6/2000 - 11/10/2014 She lived with diabetes and cushings for 3 1/2 years. She was one of a kind and we miss her.
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  #76  
Old 01-12-2020, 11:54 PM
anotherk9lover anotherk9lover is offline
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Default Re: Who took their dog to a specialist? Advice?

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Originally Posted by jesse girl View Post
you have accomplished all the important things . shots are given and testing blood sugar is not to difficult . the nice thing about this you become less reliant on the vet and most end up this way on the forum . the last time i was at the vet there was no discussion of diabetes as for me he has nothing to offer that i already dont no . jesse has kept her sight for the 10 years . the more you put into it especially in the beginning the better the outcome
It's amazing that Jesse kept her sight for so long, wow! That seems to be pretty rare from what the vets say.

I'm also very surprised that my vet didn't tell me much about the diet either. It didn't seem like he knew much about that aspect of it, he just knows to prescribe a certain brand. I was asking him about the ratio of protein/fat/carbs etc. he couldn't give me any clear answers. Nor did the specialist go into detail about it either, which is really odd considering I came to the apt for diabetes, sigh.. So I'm really surprised to read on here that diabetic dogs apparently need carbs and sugars in their diet. I wouldn't say that Daisy had any spikes or crashes on the high protein diet though. Maybe we'll try to go back to the taste of the wild for a bit and see how she does on it, or just get the prescription diet from the vet. Which brand seems to be the favorite among the group here?
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  #77  
Old 01-13-2020, 12:26 AM
anotherk9lover anotherk9lover is offline
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Default Re: Who took their dog to a specialist? Advice?

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Originally Posted by Judi View Post
to be honest. Once I had Jenny fairly regulated and wasn't as worried about her going scary low, I didn't do too many curves. I would test her sugar before I fed her and gave her her shot. It got to the point where it just made me feel better.

I do know lots of people with diabetic dogs that don't test that often. The ones on this forum are usually the problem ones with multiple issues, like Daisy!

We all do the best we can. It's great you guys are all doing it together and like Natalie said, it does become routine. After my Jenny died it was weird not to have to be home every 12 hours.

When in doubt, give less insulin. Lows are the most dangerous thing.

hang in there!
How was Jenny's eyesight?

Last edited by anotherk9lover; 01-15-2020 at 12:19 AM.
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  #78  
Old 01-13-2020, 01:00 AM
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Default Re: Who took their dog to a specialist? Advice?

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Originally Posted by anotherk9lover View Post
What was the reason your dog needed insulin every 6 hours? That is a lot of work, wow I applaud you really! I think not many people would be able to work around a schedule like that. We sometimes struggle with twice a day.
He wound up being on Regular (relatively fast acting) insulin so thatís how long each injection lasted. He was allergic to NPH (to the protein added to it) and the Vetsulin-like product available at the time didnít work well for him. We loved using R - not commonly done but worked great for him.

Natalie
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  #79  
Old 01-13-2020, 05:07 AM
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Raysaint Raysaint is offline
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Default Re: Who took their dog to a specialist? Advice?

In my case, my vet wanted me to feed Hills WD food, so I just looked for foods that were close to that in fat, fiber, protein.

And I add a little pumpkin or sweet potato, blueberries, pinto beans/oatmeal. Not all that in a meal, I switch it up each meal.

Diabetic or not, everyone needs carbs, it's what fuels the body. Insulin is what keeps it in balance.
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Riley, 8 yr. old maltipoo, 25 lbs., diagnosed Feb 2017, taking thyroid meds, had pancreatitis and DKA mid March, eating Wellness Senior formula can food. NPH dosage now at 9.0 units Humulin N. Adding either pumpkin, spinach, blueberries, yams, or green beans to his food. Also omega-3 oil.
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  #80  
Old 01-13-2020, 09:38 AM
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Default Re: Who took their dog to a specialist? Advice?

I think things are going better for Daisy than you might think. Your numbers could be worse and I think once you get back to a normal food things will settle down. Remember the lowest number is the deciding factor in dosages.

I did not follow a 12 hour dosage schedule with my dog. It was a real challenge just to get her to eat a breakfast so we aimed for a 8am and 6pm schedule. Did not always happen but we did what we could. I used several different brands of dog food for her as variety helped keep up her interest in food. I never paid much attention to ratios but did eliminate a few brands if I thought they made her numbers spike.

I always used a human meter on Snickers. We started with a human one because it was going to take a while to get an Alphatrak and just stayed with it. Her vets didn't care - I was one of the few patients that could successfully test my dog - they were more concerned about the overall trend than exact readings.

I ran my dog high. When she was first diagnosed one of the vets suggested keeping her numbers higher because they were more afraid of her not surviving lows. She had already lost most of her vision before she was diagnosed so cataracts were not as much of a concern. She did develop cataracts about 18 mo after diagnosis but she adjusted very well.

Your dog is almost a senior so there are going to be adjustments in her well being even without diabetes. It will not always go the way you might like but try not to get locked into a narrow vision of what defines success for Daisy's care. She can be happy and thriving even if she is less than physically perfect. Good luck.
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