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  #21  
Old 03-18-2011, 09:07 AM
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pat3332 pat3332 is offline
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Default Re: Mickey and home testing

I agree, that you are doing a very good job by doing what you're doing right now. That's why knowing your dog is so important. My only problem with watching Bailey's symptoms is that they are pretty much the same and he acts the same whether he's high or low. That's why I consider blood testing essential for him. Without it, I can't tell where his levels are.

I know how hard it is, but try to relax a little. You're doing fine, Mickey's levels look pretty good right now with his food and insulin where it is and you seem to be on top of watching his symptoms.

I've said this before, but to me, blood testing is easier than injections. A blood test is one quick prick to get a drop of blood. An injection is a longer needle and you're injecting a foreign substance under his skin which he probably feels more than the quick lancet stick. I think a lot of it can depend on the attitude you're conveying to your dog. If you're nervous and apprehensive, he's going to pick up on that. Try to approach it with a positive attitude, happy, playful and something to distract him, like his favorite toy. Some dogs just have a problem with being restrained. If there are two of you, one can be in front, petting and distracting him while the other does the quick prick with the lancet. I'm constantly petting and talking to Bailey during the process, even when I'm doing the actual stick.

I realize all dogs are different and some never do get use to the testing, but right now, the important thing is that you recognize the importance of it and are trying. The first time you do anything isn't usually your best effort, so just keep trying. Sometimes it's just repetition to get him use to it and finding what works best for both of you.

You're doing great. Let us know how you and Mickey are doing with the testing. Take a deep breath and try to relax. Mickey's been doing pretty good with what you've been doing up to now, you're just taking another step forward.

Pat
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  #22  
Old 03-18-2011, 09:24 AM
Mickey'sMom123 Mickey'sMom123 is offline
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Default Re: Mickey and home testing

Thanx for your responses, suggestions and pep talks This site is literally a life saver. The only reason I know what I do right now is because of this site and all of you very knowledgable and experienced people. I can't imagine not having this as a resource and blindly following my Vet's advice.

We are going to give the monitoring our best shot (and I'm already of the mindset that it's no longer NOT an option, we have to do it). I'll get the blood and my husband will hold Mickey (like we do when we give him his shots). Mickey is pretty good with the shots - he even barks for them so he can get his treat afterwards. He is a little high strung, and he barks a lot at the Vets. I've also heard him snarl at them when they take him in the back -could be why they don't want to do a curve.. Yet, they get the blood from him for the re-checks. I have mentioned doing a curve before to her and her excuse is it stresses him out and we won't get an accurate reading - I'm not buying that because they were able to do it at the beginning. Now, I've decided to insist on it. If she's resistant, I have found an internist who specializes in veterinary endocrinology (diabetes, cushings, etc.), and that's another direction I think we will take, at least for a second opinion.

I'm going home at lunch today to let everybody out (we have 3 dogs and 3 inside cats), and I'll do the Keto-Diastix for Mickey again.

I'm going to take the suggestion to increase his food by 20-25% and his insulin a tiny bit to compensate and watch that for a few days.

I'll report back.

Thank you all so much!!

Jamie (and Mickey too).
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  #23  
Old 03-18-2011, 09:52 AM
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farrwf farrwf is offline
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Default Re: Mickey and home testing

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Originally Posted by Mickey'sMom123 View Post
Thank you both for your replies.

Once I noticed that Mickey's keto-diastix were showing pretty high glucose - I started checking him 3 x a day (I run home at lunch to check on him) - some days it was better than others, but for the last few days or so, it was pretty consistent at 1000+ in the am, mid-afternoon, and just before feeding him. I don't know why she did not even suggest a curve, he hasn't had one since he was first diagnosed in November. I thought about it, and figured she knew what she was doing. Maybe not so much now. What do you think about the food and the weight loss? I'm going to be seeing the Vet again, tomorrow for my other dog who has Cushings. I'm going to tell her I want a curve one.
I test my Otis like that. It's hard enough to give him his injections, so blood testing is not in play at this point.

Otis started out with 4U 2X Humulin N. He's now at 8+U. I call it a "heavy 8" ... perhaps, 8.25.

In any event, although his urine registers on the Diastix (usually 1000 - 500 - 250) there has been no sign of ketones, and like Mickey ... there is no abnormal thirst or urination anymore.

Does anyone know if there is a relationship between the urine test results and the blood test numbers??? I know the sugar doesn't spill into the urine unless it's over 180 blood sugar level. I wonder what 250, 500, 1000, 2000 mean as far as blood sugar. It's "ancient history", but would be nice to know.
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Otis Farrell dx'd 12/10, best friend to his dad, Bill, for over 14 years. Left this world while in his dadís loving arms 10/04/13. Sonny Farrell dx'd 1/14, adopted 5/15/14. Left this world while in his dad's loving arms 9/06/16. Run pain free, you Pug guys, til we're together again.
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  #24  
Old 03-18-2011, 10:04 AM
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pat3332 pat3332 is offline
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Default Re: Mickey and home testing

Jamie,

Just wanted to make a quick comment. I believe Natalie's suggestion was to increase the food by 20-25% and leave the insulin at the 2 units it's at now, not increase it.

Quote:
To increase his weight, I would add 20-25% more food and stay with 2 units for now.
Just wanted to mention that in case you read it wrong.

More Later

Pat
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  #25  
Old 03-18-2011, 10:18 AM
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Mikayla Mikayla is offline
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Default Re: Mickey and home testing

Sasha and Mickey are similar in size...
At her 60 day review this week, we found Sasha had lost weight since her last
visit in January. (13.8 lbs., down from 14.2 lbs. in late Jan.).

The vet advised me to increase her food by a small amount.
Currently getting 3/4 cup twice a day. I asked if we should increase to a full
cup. He said no...between 3/4 and a full cup. Which would be about the
percentage Natalie recommended to you, 20 to 25%. He stressed to me,
No increase in insulin. At least not at this time.
(Of course all dogs are different..)

I hope you are able to work out a system to test Mickey.
Sasha yipped or was uncooperative on all places we tried, except the
lip....We have a system worked out now. We say time for blood test
who wants lettuce?? and she jumps up into the recliner and waits
patiently for us to do the test so she can have the treat/lettuce.
Also, I am able to wrap my hand around her jaw so that her teeth are
together and she cannot open her mouth. She has not tried to bite,
but she does like to lick us.
Good luck!

Mikayla
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Sasha mini-schnauzer, age 9 (8 at diagnosis), weight 14 (originally 18 lbs) Diagnosed 12/10, Humulin N, beginning dosage 3U, currently 5U since 1/03/11, increased to 6U 4/4/11, increased to 7U 4/14/11, increased to 8U 4/27/11, increased to 9U 5/31/11, increased to 10U 7/1/11
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  #26  
Old 03-18-2011, 10:22 AM
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farrwf farrwf is offline
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Default Re: Mickey and home testing

Quote:
Originally Posted by pat3332 View Post
I think a lot of it can depend on the attitude you're conveying to your dog. If you're nervous and apprehensive, he's going to pick up on that. Try to approach it with a positive attitude, happy, playful and something to distract him, like his favorite toy. Some dogs just have a problem with being restrained. I'm constantly petting and talking to Bailey during the process, even when I'm doing the actual stick.
Pat
I'd love for this to work Otis, but he doesn't fall for any of it with the injections.

The best I'm able to conjure up is to put a plate of cut up chicken on the floor and get him started on that, as I am stroking him. The second I try to get a bit of is skin to tent he backs off immediately. Because of this, I'm coming away with a bent needle as often as a straight one after the injection episode. He don't fall for the "Mister Nice Guy" routine.
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Otis Farrell dx'd 12/10, best friend to his dad, Bill, for over 14 years. Left this world while in his dadís loving arms 10/04/13. Sonny Farrell dx'd 1/14, adopted 5/15/14. Left this world while in his dad's loving arms 9/06/16. Run pain free, you Pug guys, til we're together again.
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  #27  
Old 03-18-2011, 11:13 AM
Mickey'sMom123 Mickey'sMom123 is offline
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Default Re: Mickey and home testing

Pat - Thanx - I did misread that - about the 20-25% increase in the food leaving the insulin at the 2 units 2 x a day.

Mikayla: When you increased Sasha's food, and left the insulin where it was, did it affect Sasha's glucose? So cute about the lettuce - Mickey loves lettuce too. His after shot treat though is a greenbean. Mickey, Jasmine and Maggie all love their greenbeans.
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  #28  
Old 03-18-2011, 07:28 PM
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pat3332 pat3332 is offline
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Default Re: Mickey and home testing

Bill, if the chicken doesn't distract him, he's tough. Once they make an association between something that causes pain with anything else, that association can be very hard to overcome. I've never been sure why some dogs react more to the lancet sticks and injections than others. I don't know if dogs also have different pain tolerances like humans do or not. Size doesn't seem to have much to do with it. I know my Rottweiler Bailey weighs 95 pounds and Craig's Annie is a 17 pound Lhasa Apso and they both seem to be pretty laid back about the whole process as long as they get their treat after the fact.

It may not make much difference, but are you using the 1/2" needles, or the shorter 5/16"? Some dogs do better with the shorter needles and some don't. I think Natalie has said that the shorter needles helped with her Chris, but I tried them with Bailey and he hates them. The only time he's ever yelped, or complained is when I've tried using the shorter needles, but he's fine with the longer 1/2". I think Bailey just does better if I can get the needle a little deeper. The closer to the skin surface I inject, the more he complains.

Another thing some people have done with dogs that associate the tenting with the injection is to skip the tenting process and just slip the needle under the skin at an angle. Also, some dogs do better with a slow injection and some do better if you just stick, inject and get it out as fast as possible.

You've probably already tried all of these suggestions as well as making sure the insulin has been warmed to at least body temperature and isn't cold. I'm just throwing out ideas.

Pat
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  #29  
Old 03-18-2011, 07:42 PM
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pat3332 pat3332 is offline
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Default Re: Mickey and home testing

Jamie,

It's been my experience that there is much less stress to the dog when doing home testing than when going to the vet. Just going to the vet stresses most dogs enough to affect the glucose levels and if they're having to fight with him to do the blood tests it's going to affect them even more. Bailey likes his vet and doesn't seem that stressed when we go, but his levels are still higher at his clinic than they are at home.

I may have missed it and it's not that important, but what meter are you using?

Pat
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  #30  
Old 03-19-2011, 04:40 AM
Mickey'sMom123 Mickey'sMom123 is offline
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Default Re: Mickey and home testing

We have the Alpha Trac. We purchased it from the Vet when he was first diagnosed. We started out at the beginning trying to do everything to stay on top of it, but it turned out to be very difficult with Mickey. We can't do his mouth, his ears and pads were difficult (couldn't get blood), and when we tried, it was really stressing him. With this recent development, I did more research on this site, and found that we can do it at the base above his tail, as long as we shave that area - which will be done at his groomers this afternoon (at 2:00 pm e.s.t.). I'm thinking that we will test him before dinner tonight to see where he is. Did the Keto-Diastix this morning and still showing 2000+, but thankfully no ketones. We just don't know where he actually is.

Jamie
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